Mar. 15th, 2011

17biruza: (Бодрое что-то)
Отсюда

The Inuit language, like other Eskimo-Aleut languages, has a very rich morphological system, in which a succession of different morphemes are added to root words (like verb endings in European languages) to indicate things that, in languages like English, would require several words to express. (See also: Agglutinative language and Polysynthetic language) All Inuit language words begin with a root morpheme to which other morphemes are suffixed. The language has hundreds of distinct suffixes, in some dialects as many as 700. Fortunately for learners, the language has a highly regular morphology. Although the rules are sometimes very complicated, they do not have exceptions in the sense that English and other Indo-European languages do.

This system makes words very long, and potentially unique. For example in central Nunavut Inuktitut:

tusaatsiarunnanngittualuujunga
I can't hear very well.

This long word is composed of a root word tusaa- - to hear - followed by five suffixes:

-tsiaq-well
-junnaq-be able to
-nngit-not 
-tualuu-very much
-junga1st pers. singular present indicative non-specific

 
Ну что, кто хочет изучать иннуитский? )

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17biruza

August 2011

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